Oregon's High Desert
Oregon Desert Land Trust

Brought together by a shared love of Oregon's high desert.

Oregon’s high desert spans over 10 million acres and is home to areas of stunning beauty, robust wildlife populations, significant cultural heritage and recreational opportunities. Private lands conservation is critical to keeping this area intact for future generations.

The land trust’s work and shared lands bring us together to create social, economic and environmental benefits for Oregon’s high desert.

Oregon's High Desert

Connecting Wild and Working Lands

Oregon’s high desert holds many tracts of private land that are critical for wildlife habitat, land conservation, cultural preservation and public access. The Oregon Desert Land Trust was established to create opportunities to conserve and restore private lands in the region while also benefitting surrounding public lands. Established by the Oregon Natural Desert Association at the close of 2017, the land trust now operates as an independent organization and has conserved over 3,000 acres since its inception.

Needed

Oregon’s high desert, although composed of significant areas of public land, contains tracts of private land that are critical to wildlife habitat connectivity and public lands access. Until now, there was no land trust dedicated to this important area.

Timely

Similar to other areas in the West, Oregon’s high desert is experiencing turnover in land ownership that is driven in part by inter-generational shifts. Likewise, the region has witnessed a transition towards more recreation-oriented properties that will eventually drive up land valuation. Now is the time to work to conserve and restore private lands in the region.

Focused

The Oregon Desert Land Trust has identified three categories of lands that are strategic for land conservation and habitat connectivity in the region.

These include:

  • Conservation areas prioritized by the largest areas of public lands with the least amount of private inholdings;

  • Springs, wet meadows and streams due to their significant contributions to fish, wildlife and public use; and

  • Greater sage-grouse habitat which also provides the foundation for wildlife connectivity and open space in the region.

Volunteer-Driven

With support from volunteers with decades of experience in realty, law, business and science, relationships with landowners and knowledge of the region, ODLT is positioned to be a lasting and effective land trust.

Results-Oriented

The Land Trust has completed several acquisitions totaling over 3,000 acres. These areas will be conserved for wildlife and future generations.

For more information, please contact us at (970) 350-9458 or info@oregondesertlandtrust.org